Business Insurance Options

 Business & Commercial Insurance

 It takes a lot to run a business and each business is unique. We know you face challenges every day, not the least of which is insuring your business. Everything from General Liability, Commercial Auto and Workers Compensation to Professional Liability and Surety Bonds; it can get overwhelming for any business owners, partners and CEO’s.

We will take the time to get to know you and your business.  We will help you understand the coverage you need as well as the other coverage you should consider, all with no pressure.  

We know your business is just as important to you as our business is to us:

 

Our Business Is Helping You Take Care of Your Insurance Needs.

We Offer:

 



Description of Common Policies

Business Owners Package (BOP) Policy
A Business Owner Policy or BOP is an insurance package that assembles the basic coverages required by a business owner in one bundle.
 
Commercial General Liability (CGL) Policy
A standard insurance policy issued to business organizations to protect them against liability claims for bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) arising out of premises, operations, products, and completed operations; and advertising and personal injury (PI) liability.
 
Commercial Property Policy
An insurance policy for businesses and other organizations that insures against damage to their buildings and contents due to a covered cause of loss, such as a fire. The policy may also cover loss of income or increase in expenses that results from the property damage (PD). Commercial property policies may be written on standard or nonstandard forms.
 
Business Income and Extra Expense Coverage
Commercial property insurance covering loss of income suffered by a business when damage to its premises by a covered cause of loss causes a slowdown or suspension of its operations. Coverage applies to loss suffered during the time required to repair or replace the damaged property. It may also be extended to apply to loss suffered after completion of repairs for a specified number of days.  Extra Expense coverage pays for additional costs in excess of normal operating expenses that an organization incurs to continue operations while its property is being repaired or replaced after having been damaged by a covered cause of loss.
 
Commercial Auto Policy (a.k.a Business Auto Policy)
Much like a personal auto policy, Commercial Auto Insurance that protects the insured against financial loss because of legal liability for automobile-related injuries to others or damage to their property by an auto used for your business needs.  Important coverages to include on your commercial auto policy are Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist, Medical Payments, Physical Damage to your auto (Comp & Collision) and Hired/Non-Owned Auto coverage.  Depending on the type of vehicle you use for your business you may also want to consider Rental Car and Towing/Roadside Assistance.
 
Workers Compensation and Employers Liability Policy
An insurance policy that provides coverage for an employer's two key exposures arising out of injuries sustained by employees. Part One of the policy covers the employer's statutory liabilities under workers compensation laws, and Part Two of the policy covers liability arising out of employees' work-related injuries that do not fall under the workers compensation statute. In most states, the standard workers compensation and employers liability policy published by the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) is the required policy form.
 
Umbrella Liability Policy
A policy designed to provide protection against catastrophic losses. It generally is written over various primary liability policies, such as the business auto policy (BAP), commercial general liability (CGL) policy, watercraft and aircraft liability policies, and employers’ liability coverage. The umbrella policy serves three purposes: it provides excess limits when the limits of underlying liability policies are exhausted by the payment of claims; it drops down and picks up where the underlying policy leaves off when the aggregate limit of the underlying policy in question is exhausted by the payment of claims; and it provides protection against some claims not covered by the underlying policies, subject to the assumption by the named insured of a self-insured retention (SIR).
 
Professional Liability Policy
A type of liability coverage designed to protect traditional professionals (e.g., accountants, attorneys) and quasi-professionals (e.g., real estate brokers, consultants) against liability incurred as a result of errors and omissions in performing their professional services. Although there are a few exceptions (e.g., physicians, architects, and engineers), most professional liability policies only cover economic or financial losses suffered by third parties, as opposed to bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) claims. This is because the latter two types of loss are typically covered under commercial general liability (CGL) policies. The vast majority of professional liability policies are written with claims-made coverage triggers. In addition, professional liability policies contain what are known as "shrinking limits," meaning that unlike CGL policies (where defense costs are paid in addition to policy limits), the insurer's payment of defense costs reduces available policy limits. Accordingly, when attempting to determine appropriate policy limits, insureds must consider the fact that because defense costs are often a high proportion of any claim settlement or judgment, they must usually purchase additional limits. The most common exclusions in professional liability policy forms are for BI, PD, and intentional/dishonest acts.
 
Errors and Omissions (E&O) Insurance
An insurance form that protects the insured against liability for committing an error or omission in performance of professional duties. Generally, such policies are designed to cover financial losses rather than liability for bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD).
 
Directors and Officers (D&O) Liability Insurance
A type of liability insurance covering directors and officers for claims made against them while serving on a board of directors and/or as an officer. D&O liability insurance can be written to cover the directors and officers of for-profit businesses, privately held firms, not-for-profit organizations, and educational institutions. In effect, the policies function as "management errors and omissions liability insurance," covering claims resulting from managerial decisions that have adverse financial consequences. The policies contain "shrinking limits" provisions, meaning that defense costs—which are often a substantial part of a claim—reduce the policy's limits. This approach contrasts with commercial general liability (CGL) policies, in which defense is covered in addition to policy limits. Other distinctive features of D&O policies are that they: (1) are written on a claims-made basis, (2) usually contain no explicit duty to defend the insureds (when covering for-profit businesses), and (3) cover monetary damages but exclude bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD).
 
Truckers Policy
A commercial auto policy designed to address the needs of the "for-hire" motor carrier (i.e., trucking) industry. Coverages available include auto liability, trailer interchange, and auto physical damage; other coverages are available by endorsement
 
Garage Liability Insurance
Insurance covering the legal liability of franchised and non-franchised automobile, truck, truck-tractor, motorcycle, recreational vehicle, and trailer dealers for claims of bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) arising out of business operations. It includes two separate insuring agreements, "who is an insured" provisions, and "limit of insurance" provisions—one dealing with garage operations involving the ownership, maintenance, or use of autos and the other dealing with all other garage operations.
 
Garagekeepers Coverage / Garagekeepers Legal Liability Insurance
Coverage provided under a garage policy for auto and trailer dealers, particularly those dealers that maintain a service department or body shop, for liability exposures with respect to damage to a customer's auto or auto equipment that has been left in the dealer's care for service or repair, for example. For other types of auto-related businesses, such coverage is available under the garagekeepers coverage endorsement (CA 99 37). Coverage is contingent on establishing liability on the part of the insured.
 
Builders Risk Policy
A property insurance policy that is designed to cover property in the course of construction. There is no single standard builders risk form; most builders risk policies are written on inland marine (rather than commercial property) forms. Coverage is usually written on an all risks basis and typically applies not only to property at the construction site, but also to property at off-site storage locations and in transit. Builders risk insurance can be written on either a completed value or a reporting form basis; in either case, the estimated completed value of the project is used as the limit of insurance.
 
Surety Bond
A three-party contract under which the insurer agrees to pay losses caused by criminal acts (e.g., fidelity bonds) or the failure to perform a specific act (e.g., performance or surety bonds). The principal (i.e., the party paying the bond premium) is also called the obligor (i.e., the party with the obligation to perform). If there is a default, the surety (i.e., the insurer) pays the loss of the third party (the obligee). The obligor must then reimburse the surety for the amount of loss paid.
           
Notary Public Bonds
Include bonds that are required by statutes to protect against losses resulting from the improper actions of notaries.
 
Fidelity Bonds
Bonds designed to protect against dishonesty. Generally, the bond protects against dishonesty of employees. These bonds cover losses arising from employee dishonesty and indemnify the principal for losses caused by the dishonest actions of its employees.
 
Fiduciary
One who is appointed to act in the best interests of another. A fiduciary is a person or entity appointed by the court to handle the affairs of persons who are not able to do so themselves. Fiduciaries are often requested to furnish a bond to protect against a lack of faithful performance of their duties.
 
Fiduciary Bonds
Bonds which protect against dishonest accountings and a lack of faithful performance of duties by administrators, trustees, guardians, executors, and other fiduciaries. Fiduciary bonds, often referred to as probate bonds, are required by statutes, courts, or legal documents for the protection of those on whose behalf a fiduciary acts. They are needed under a variety of circumstances, including the administration of an estate and the management of affairs of a trust or a ward.
 
License and Permit Bonds
License and Permit Bonds are required to obtain a license or permit in many cities, counties, states or other political subdivisions. They may be required for a number of reasons, including the payment of certain taxes and fees or providing consumer protection as a condition to granting licenses related to selling things such as motor vehicles or contracting services.
 Contract Bonds
A general classification of bonds that provide financial security and construction assurance on building and construction projects by assuring the project owner (obligee) that the contractor (principal) will perform the work and pay certain subcontractors, laborers, and material suppliers.

 

(IRMI – Insurance Risk Management Institute, Inc.)

 

This website provides a basic summary of the insurance products offered by CU Insurance Services of TN, LLC. It is not a statement of contract and coverage may not apply in all areas. For a complete description of coverage, please read the insurance policy, including all endorsements.